Migrating Legacy Formats

Migrating from legacy formats is different from migrating Fluent to Fluent. When migrating legacy code paths, you’ll need to adjust the Fluent strings for the quirks Mozilla uses in the legacy code paths. You’ll find a number of specialized functionalities here.

Basic Migration

Let’s consider a basic example: one string needs to be migrated, without any further change, from a DTD file to Fluent.

The legacy string is stored in toolkit/locales/en-US/chrome/global/findbar.dtd:

<!ENTITY next.tooltip "Find the next occurrence of the phrase">

The new Fluent string is stored in toolkit/locales/en-US/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl:

findbar-next =
    .tooltiptext = Find the next occurrence of the phrase

This is how the migration recipe looks:

# Any copyright is dedicated to the Public Domain.
# http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

from __future__ import absolute_import
import fluent.syntax.ast as FTL
from fluent.migrate.helpers import transforms_from

def migrate(ctx):
    """Bug 1411707 - Migrate the findbar XBL binding to a Custom Element, part {index}."""

    ctx.add_transforms(
        "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
        "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
        transforms_from(
"""
findbar-next =
    .tooltiptext = { COPY(from_path, "next.tooltip") }
""", from_path="toolkit/chrome/global/findbar.dtd"))

The first important thing to notice is that the migration recipe needs file paths relative to a localization repository, losing locales/en-US/:

  • toolkit/locales/en-US/chrome/global/findbar.dtd becomes toolkit/chrome/global/findbar.dtd.

  • toolkit/locales/en-US/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl becomes toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl.

The context.add_transforms function takes 3 arguments:

  • Path to the target l10n file.

  • Path to the reference (en-US) file.

  • An array of Transforms. Transforms are AST nodes which describe how legacy translations should be migrated.

Note

For migrations of Firefox localizations, the target and reference path are the same. This isn’t true for all projects that use Fluent, so both arguments are required.

In this case there is only one Transform that migrates the string with ID next.tooltip from toolkit/chrome/global/findbar.dtd, and injects it in the FTL fragment. The COPY Transform allows to copy the string from an existing file as is, while from_path is used to avoid repeating the same path multiple times, making the recipe more readable. Without from_path, this could be written as:

ctx.add_transforms(
    "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
    "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
    transforms_from(
"""
findbar-next =
    .tooltiptext = { COPY("toolkit/chrome/global/findbar.dtd", "next.tooltip") }
"""))

This method of writing migration recipes allows to take the original FTL strings, and simply replace the value of each message with a COPY Transform. transforms_from takes care of converting the FTL syntax into an array of Transforms describing how the legacy translations should be migrated. This manner of defining migrations is only suitable to simple strings where a copy operation is sufficient. For more complex use-cases which require some additional logic in Python, it’s necessary to resort to the raw AST.

The example above is equivalent to the following syntax, which exposes the underlying AST structure:

ctx.add_transforms(
    "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
    "toolkit/toolkit/main-window/findbar.ftl",
    [
        FTL.Message(
            id=FTL.Identifier("findbar-next"),
            attributes=[
                FTL.Attribute(
                    id=FTL.Identifier("tooltiptext"),
                    value=COPY(
                        "toolkit/chrome/global/findbar.dtd",
                        "next.tooltip"
                    )
                )
            ]
        )
    ]
)

This creates a Message, taking the value from the legacy string findbar-next. A message can have an array of attributes, each with an ID and a value: in this case there is only one attribute, with ID tooltiptext and value copied from the legacy string.

Notice how both the ID of the message and the ID of the attribute are defined as an FTL.Identifier, not simply as a string.

Tip

It’s possible to concatenate arrays of Transforms defined manually, like in the last example, with those coming from transforms_from, by using the + operator. Alternatively, it’s possible to use multiple add_transforms.

The order of Transforms provided in the recipe is not relevant, the reference file is used for ordering messages.

Replacing Content in Legacy Strings

While COPY allows to copy a legacy string as is, REPLACE (from fluent.migrate) allows to replace content while performing the migration. This is necessary, for example, when migrating strings that include placeholders or entities that need to be replaced to adapt to Fluent syntax.

Consider for example the following string:

<!ENTITY aboutSupport.featuresTitle "&brandShortName; Features">

Which needs to be migrated to:

features-title = { -brand-short-name } Features

The entity &brandShortName; needs to be replaced with a term reference:

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("features-title"),
    value=REPLACE(
        "toolkit/chrome/global/aboutSupport.dtd",
        "aboutSupport.featuresTitle",
        {
            "&brandShortName;": TERM_REFERENCE("brand-short-name"),
        },
    )
),

This creates an FTL.Message, taking the value from the legacy string aboutSupport.featuresTitle, but replacing the specified text with a Fluent term reference.

Note

REPLACE replaces all occurrences of the specified text.

It’s also possible to replace content with a specific text: in that case, it needs to be defined as a TextElement. For example, to replace example.com with HTML markup:

value=REPLACE(
    "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/preferences.properties",
    "searchResults.sorryMessageWin",
    {
        "example.com": FTL.TextElement('<span data-l10n-name="example"></span>')
    }
)

The situation is more complex when a migration recipe needs to replace printf arguments like %S. In fact, the format used for localized and source strings doesn’t need to match, and the two following strings using unordered and ordered argument are perfectly equivalent:

btn-quit = Quit %S
btn-quit = Quit %1$S

In this scenario, replacing %S would work on the first version, but not on the second, and there’s no guarantee that the localized string uses the same format as the source string.

Consider also the following string that uses %S for two different variables, implicitly relying on the order in which the arguments appear:

updateFullName = %S (%S)

And the target Fluent string:

update-full-name = { $name } ({ $buildID })

As indicated, REPLACE would replace all occurrences of %S, so only one variable could be set. The string needs to be normalized and treated like:

updateFullName = %1$S (%2$S)

This can be obtained by calling REPLACE with normalize_printf=True:

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("update-full-name"),
    value=REPLACE(
        "toolkit/chrome/mozapps/update/updates.properties",
        "updateFullName",
        {
            "%1$S": VARIABLE_REFERENCE("name"),
            "%2$S": VARIABLE_REFERENCE("buildID"),
        },
        normalize_printf=True
    )
)

Attention

To avoid any issues normalize_printf=True should always be used when replacing printf arguments.

Note

VARIABLE_REFERENCE, MESSAGE_REFERENCE, and TERM_REFERENCE are helper Transforms which can be used to save keystrokes in common cases where using the raw AST is too verbose.

VARIABLE_REFERENCE is used to create a reference to a variable, e.g. { $variable }.

MESSAGE_REFERENCE is used to create a reference to another message, e.g. { another-string }.

TERM_REFERENCE is used to create a reference to a term, e.g. { -brand-short-name }.

Both Transforms need to be imported at the beginning of the recipe, e.g. from fluent.migrate.helpers import VARIABLE_REFERENCE

Removing Unnecessary Whitespaces in Translations

It’s not uncommon to have lines with unnecessary leading or trailing spaces in DTDs. These are not meaningful, don’t have practical results on the way the string is displayed in products, and are added only for formatting reasons. For example, consider this string:

<!ENTITY aboutAbout.note   "This is a list of “about” pages for your convenience.<br/>
                            Some of them might be confusing. Some are for diagnostic purposes only.<br/>
                            And some are omitted because they require query strings.">

If migrated as is, it would result in:

about-about-note =
    This is a list of “about” pages for your convenience.<br/>
                                Some of them might be confusing. Some are for diagnostic purposes only.<br/>
                                And some are omitted because they require query strings.

This can be avoided by trimming the migrated string, with trim:”True” or trim=True, depending on the context:

transforms_from(
"""
about-about-note = { COPY("toolkit/chrome/global/aboutAbout.dtd", "aboutAbout.note", trim:"True") }
""")

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("discover-description"),
    value=REPLACE(
        "toolkit/chrome/mozapps/extensions/extensions.dtd",
        "discover.description2",
        {
            "&brandShortName;": TERM_REFERENCE("-brand-short-name")
        },
        trim=True
    )
),

Attention

Trimming whitespaces should only be done when migrating strings from DTDs, not for other file formats, and when it’s clear that the context makes whitespaces irrelevant. A counter example would be the use of a string in combination with white-space: pre.

Concatenating Strings

It’s best practice to only expose complete phrases to localization, and to avoid stitching localized strings together in code. With DTD and properties, there were little options. So when migrating Fluent, you’ll find it quite common to concatenate multiple strings coming from DTD and properties, for example to create sentences with HTML markup. It’s possible to concatenate strings and text elements in a migration recipe using the CONCAT Transform.

Note that, in case of simple migrations using transforms_from, the concatenation is carried out implicitly by using the Fluent syntax interleaved with COPY() transform calls to define the migration recipe.

Consider the following example:

# %S is replaced by a link, using searchResults.needHelpSupportLink as text
searchResults.needHelp = Need help? Visit %S

# %S is replaced by "Firefox"
searchResults.needHelpSupportLink = %S Support

In Fluent:

search-results-need-help-support-link = Need help? Visit <a data-l10n-name="url">{ -brand-short-name } Support</a>

This is quite a complex migration: it requires to take 2 legacy strings, and concatenate their values with HTML markup. Here’s how the Transform is defined:

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("search-results-help-link"),
    value=REPLACE(
        "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/preferences.properties",
        "searchResults.needHelp",
        {
            "%S": CONCAT(
                FTL.TextElement('<a data-l10n-name="url">'),
                REPLACE(
                    "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/preferences.properties",
                    "searchResults.needHelpSupportLink",
                    {
                        "%1$S": TERM_REFERENCE("brand-short-name"),
                    },
                    normalize_printf=True
                ),
                FTL.TextElement("</a>")
            )
        }
    )
),

%S in searchResults.needHelpSupportLink is replaced by a reference to the term -brand-short-name, migrating from %S Support to { -brand-short-name } Support. The result of this operation is then inserted between two text elements to create the anchor markup. The resulting text is finally used to replace %S in searchResults.needHelp, and used as value for the FTL message.

Important

When concatenating existing strings, avoid introducing changes to the original text, for example adding spaces or punctuation. Each language has its own rules, and this might result in poor migrated strings. In case of doubt, always ask for feedback.

Plural Strings

Migrating plural strings from .properties files usually involves two Transforms from fluent.migrate.transforms: the REPLACE_IN_TEXT Transform takes TextElements as input, making it possible to pass it as the foreach function of the PLURALS Transform.

Consider the following legacy string:

# LOCALIZATION NOTE (disableContainersOkButton): Semi-colon list of plural forms.
# See: http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Localization_and_Plurals
# #1 is the number of container tabs
disableContainersOkButton = Close #1 Container Tab;Close #1 Container Tabs

In Fluent:

containers-disable-alert-ok-button =
    { $tabCount ->
        [one] Close { $tabCount } Container Tab
       *[other] Close { $tabCount } Container Tabs
    }

This is how the Transform for this string is defined:

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("containers-disable-alert-ok-button"),
    value=PLURALS(
        "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/preferences.properties",
        "disableContainersOkButton",
        VARIABLE_REFERENCE("tabCount"),
        lambda text: REPLACE_IN_TEXT(
            text,
            {
                "#1": VARIABLE_REFERENCE("tabCount")
            }
        )
    )
)

The PLURALS Transform will take care of creating the correct number of plural categories for each language. Notice how #1 is replaced for each of these variants with { $tabCount }, using REPLACE_IN_TEXT and VARIABLE_REFERENCE(“tabCount”).

In this case it’s not possible to use REPLACE because it takes a file path and a message ID as arguments, whereas here the recipe needs to operate on regular text. The replacement is performed on each plural form of the original string, where plural forms are separated by a semicolon.

Explicit Variants

Explicitly creating variants of a string is useful for platform-dependent terminology, but also in cases where you want a one-vs-many split of a string. It’s always possible to migrate strings by manually creating the underlying AST structure. Consider the following complex Fluent string:

use-current-pages =
    .label =
        { $tabCount ->
            [1] Use Current Page
           *[other] Use Current Pages
        }
    .accesskey = C

The migration for this string is quite complex: the label attribute is created from 2 different legacy strings, and it’s not a proper plural form. Notice how the first string is associated to the 1 case, not the one category used in plural forms. For these reasons, it’s not possible to use PLURALS, the Transform needs to be crafted recreating the AST.

FTL.Message(
    id=FTL.Identifier("use-current-pages"),
    attributes=[
        FTL.Attribute(
            id=FTL.Identifier("label"),
            value=FTL.Pattern(
                elements=[
                    FTL.Placeable(
                        expression=FTL.SelectExpression(
                            selector=VARIABLE_REFERENCE("tabCount"),
                            variants=[
                                FTL.Variant(
                                    key=FTL.NumberLiteral("1"),
                                    default=False,
                                    value=COPY(
                                        "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/main.dtd",
                                        "useCurrentPage.label",
                                    )
                                ),
                                FTL.Variant(
                                    key=FTL.Identifier("other"),
                                    default=True,
                                    value=COPY(
                                        "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/main.dtd",
                                        "useMultiple.label",
                                    )
                                )
                            ]
                        )
                    )
                ]
            )
        ),
        FTL.Attribute(
            id=FTL.Identifier("accesskey"),
            value=COPY(
                "browser/chrome/browser/preferences/main.dtd",
                "useCurrentPage.accesskey",
            )
        ),
    ],
),

This Transform uses several concepts already described in this document. Notable is the SelectExpression inside a Placeable, with an array of Variant objects. Exactly one of those variants needs to have default=True.

This example can still use transforms_from()`(), since existing strings are copied without interpolation.

transforms_from(
"""
use-current-pages =
    .label =
        { $tabCount ->
            [1] { COPY(main_dtd, "useCurrentPage.label") }
           *[other] { COPY(main_dtd, "useMultiple.label") }
        }
    .accesskey = { COPY(main_dtd, "useCurrentPage.accesskey") }
""", main_dtd="browser/chrome/browser/preferences/main.dtd"
)